Moment Scrapping vs. Event Scrapping

moments

We don’t get hung up on definitions or labels here at The Daily Digi, because we really believe that any way a memory is documented is the right way. It’s not important to categorize layouts, but it can be a great learning tool to understand some of the different approaches we can take to tell our stories.

One of the topics we sometimes discuss on The Digi Show is “event scrapping” vs. “moment scrapping”. In my mind, the two can exist together because even when I’m scrapbooking about an event such as a vacation, birthday, holiday, family gathering, etc., I’m still capturing and focusing on “moments” that I want to remember. On the flip side, picking out a moment to document such as feelings for my children, illustrating the evolution of technology that I have used, the passage of time, a relationship, etc., involve “events” – even if they are just from an ordinary day. There’s no need to split hairs on this topic though, it’s all about what works for you for each particular page. The best way to explain this is to use real examples from some of the incredible scrappers who upload to our Flickr group.

This stunning layout records the lessons this mom has learned in parenting her little guy. The photos focus on the relationship between the two of them and the journaling doesn’t concern itself with documenting a specific day, but covers a range of a few years. This definitely feels like “moment scrapping” to me!

7290263658_50917cf67f_c

A darling page about Halloween 2009 is a great example of scrapping an event. The pictures and journaling all center around what happened for Halloween that year. The writing does a great job of capturing that moment in time.

image

Seems easy, right? Well, it’s not always so clear cut.

Project 365 style layouts like this one with a very cool design are all about documenting a specific point in time like a certain day, week, month, or even year. Even though the “moments” are the focus of the journaling, the layout still seems more event based to me. I’m sure others might disagree and that’s perfectly fine as it really doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things.

7275028084_59d5d78aaa_c (1)

This sweet page features a picture from a birthday party and journaling relating to that event so it seems natural to call it an “event page”. However, it’s also focusing on the relationship between the two people in the picture and I certainly didn’t know it was a birthday page until I read the journaling. So is it “event” or “moment” scrapping? Seems like both to me!

7324273134_c3a899ba25_z

The truth is that our lives are filled with events AND moments and they are all happening at the same time. Any topic could be scrapped from either point of view and there is no wrong or right way to approach it all. I’ve found that in the middle of recording a vacation, that I might choose to highlight a picture of a specific person and journal about my feelings for them. The overall presentation of my vacation pages might be from an event point of view, but there can certainly be flashes of moments included as well. The reverse is true as well- in scrapping a moment, I’m capturing a specific point in time. It’s all good and it’s all appreciated by those who enjoy your creations.

The best reason to bring all of this up? I find that if I’m struggling to find a journaling voice for a page, it helps me to think about if I’m approaching it from an event or a moment standpoint. Sometimes I just want to record the what, when, and where of a page (event).

The day my daughter got braces on her teeth

4385999201_60c7cbf045_z

Other times I will focus on the emotions and relationships (moment). This page explains some of my feelings about being a mom.

4582637426_2106f647c7_z

I’d love to hear your thoughts on moment vs. event scrapping? Do you think about the differences? Which style do you tend to favor in your own scrapping? Do you ever combine the two approaches? Just some fun things to think about!

katie big

P.S. The title graphic was creating with KStudio on the fly borders and the Bickley Script font