Involving the Reader in Your Journaling with Chelle

We are so excited to have Chelle of Chelle’s Creations here with a guest post today! She is a master of word art titles and lots of journaling! Here’s a little more about Chelle:

clip_image001

chelle_photo Chelle lives in a small rural community in northern Utah with her husband and four of their kids still living at home…two are away at college. She’s been scrapbooking for many years, but LOVES digi! Chelle can be found at ScrapMatters where she is a designer. Chelle’s journaling class: Tell Me More is starting again January 10th. You can register HERE. Chelle is offering a discount for TDD readers: 5offTMM4TDD

clip_image001

che

Do you put off journaling on your layouts?  Do you skip it because you don’t know what to say?  Or you are afraid it will sound boring?  Good journaling can really involve the reader in the memory that you are sharing. I’d like to share a few tips for writing journaling that involves the reader.

#1: Actions speak louder than words.

Show with your words rather than telling. Too many stories seem flat and monotonous because their authors do too much telling.  What does that mean? It means show us that your son was devastated that as a three year old, he didn’t get to accompany his brother on the school bus. Talk about his actions. What did he DO that made you know what he felt. Clung to the bus stair railing? Slumped shoulders? Crying? Collapsed into a heap of tears?

The game was exciting? Earlofoxford shows us how exciting the Florida State vs. Clemson was:

(All images are linked)

floridastclemsonr

.

#2: Don’t argue your point, just present the evidence.

Besides making your story more interesting, Showing makes it more believable. By showing you support your case that your brother was a brat. Readers like to form their own opinions based on the evidence you present.

You had a bad morning? Show it:

lifewithoutB_postable

.

#3 If you want to catch a fish, you need a hook.

You will attract readers if the first thing they read is a hook: an interesting opening sentence or paragraph. Like this one from Amber565: “To protect my baby I had to kill hers…”

It-Still-Doesn_t

.

The next time you are working on a layout, take a moment to think about these tips and how you can involve the reader in your journaling. The extra effort is worth it! I promise it gets easier with practice. Soon you’ll be loving your “new” journaling style!

chelle